norsecorp cyber attack info

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Um site dinâmico q mapeia informação sobre ciberataques em tempo real

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Statistical Atlas

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clicar na imagem para seguir o link

Um projeto em curso que pretende criar mapas temáticos de todos os dados existentes nos EUA, ambicioso, não?

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The beautiful R charts in London: The Information Capital

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Um bom exemplo de utilização de gráficos do R em ilustração.

If you’ve lived in or simply love London, a wonderful new book for your coffee-table is London: The Information Capital. In 100 beautifully-rendered charts, the book explores the data that underlies the city and its residents. To create most of these charts, geographer James Cheshire and designer Oliver Uberti relied on programs written in R. Using the R programming language not only created beautiful results, it saved time: “a couple of lines of code in R saved a day of manually drawing lines”.

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Poverty and Race in America

Uma boa representação gráfica interactiva

Uma boa representação gráfica interactiva

Strategies to tackle poverty, inequality, and neighborhood distress must be informed by local data. The history, geography, and politics of individual metro regions all matter profoundly, and any serious policy strategy must be tailored to local realities.
To help take the policy conversation from the general to the specific, we offer a new mapping tool. It lets you explore changes from 1980 to 2010 in where poor people of different races and ethnicities lived, for every metropolitan region nationwide.
Understanding how the geography of poverty has changed can provide essential context for answering questions like: Are some poor neighborhoods isolated from the region’s job opportunities? What would it take to connect them? Where should family support services be targeted? Which neighborhoods should be prioritized for improvements in essential amenities and opportunities? How can poor people across the metro landscape be better connected to the services and opportunities they seek?
For metro regions to systematically reduce poverty and expand opportunity, local civic and political leaders, advocates, and practitioners should start by sitting down together to understand the evolving realities of poverty, race, and place in their communities. We hope our maps help catalyze these conversations.

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Vector maps on the web with Mapbox GL

Novas funcionalidades da biblioteca Java para desenhar mapas vetoriais

Novas funcionalidades da biblioteca Java Script para desenhar mapas vetoriais

Online mapping just got an upgrade:

Announcing Mapbox GL JS — a fast and powerful new system for web maps. Mapbox GL JS is a client-side renderer, so it uses JavaScript and WebGL to dynamically draw data with the speed and smoothness of a video game. Instead of fixing styles and zoom levels at the server level, Mapbox GL puts power in JavaScript, allowing for dynamic styling and freeform interactivity.

For the non-developers: Online maps are typically stored pre-made on a server, in the form of a bunch of image files that are stitched together when you zoom in and out of a map. So developers have to periodically update the image files if they want their base maps to change. It’s a hassle, which is why base maps often look similar. With Mapbox GL, making changes is easier because the development pipeline is shorter.

More details on the JavaScript library here.

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Income inequality seen in satellite images from Google Earth

Uso de proxis para identificar vizinhanças pobres

Uso de proxis para identificar vizinhanças pobres

Researchers Pengyu Zhua and Yaoqi Zhang noted in their 2008 paper that “the demand for urban forests is elastic with respect to price and highly responsive to changes in income.” Poor neighborhoods tend to have fewer trees and the rate of forestry growth is slower than that of richer neighborhoods.

Tim De Chant of Per Square Mile wondered if this difference could be seen through satellite images in Google Earth. It turns out that you can see the distinct difference in a lot of places. Above, for example, shows two areas in Rio de Janeiro: Rocinha on the left and Zona Sul on the right. Notice the tree-lined streets versus the not so green.

De Chant notes:

It’s easy to see trees as a luxury when a city can barely keep its roads and sewers in working order, but that glosses over the many benefits urban trees provide. They shade houses in the summer, reducing cooling bills. They scrub the air of pollution, especially of the particulate variety, which in many poor neighborhoods is responsible for increased asthma rates and other health problems. They also reduce stress, which has its own health benefits. Large, established trees can even fight crime.

Okay, I don’t now about that last part about fighting crime. Without seeing the data, I think that sounds like a correlation more than anything else, but still. Trees. Good.

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Site sobre visualização da GE.com

Site com muitos exemplos de visualização mantido pela GE

Site com muitos exemplos de visualização mantido pela GE

GE Works. Building, Moving, Powering and Curing the world. In the process, our technologies are generating data on a petabyte scale. This data contains valuable information that will drive insights, innovations, and discoveries, but it can be difficult to access and digest. Using data visualization, we’re pairing science and design to simplify the complexity and drive a deeper understanding of the context in which we operate.

Check out our latest video.

We encourage you to explore the projects below.

For further information about GE’s data visualization program, please contact us at datavizinfo@ge.com

To share your own visualizations, please visit www.visualizing.org

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Warm and cold weather anomalies

Mais um exemplo de boas visualizações, agora com dados de clima

Mais um exemplo de boas visualizações, agora com dados de clima

This year’s polar vortex churned up some global warming skeptics, but as we know, it’s more useful to look at trends over significant spans of time than isolated events. And, when you do look at a trend, it’s useful to have a proper baseline to compare against.

To this end, Enigma.io compared warm weather anomalies against cold weather anomalies, from 1964 to 2013. That is, they counted the number of days per year that were warmer than expected and the days it was colder than expected.

An animated map leads the post, but the meat is in the time series. There’s a clear trend towards more warm.

Since 1964, the proportion of warm and strong warm anomalies has risen from about 42% of the total to almost 67% of the total – an average increase of 0.5% per year. This trend, fitted with a generalized linear model, accounts for 40% of the year-to-year variation in warm versus cold anomalies, and is highly significant with a p-value approaching 0.0. Though we remain cautious about making predictions based on this model, it suggests that this yearly proportion of warm anomalies will regularly fall above 70% in the 2030’s.

Explore in full or download the data and analyze yourself. Nice work. [Thanks, Dan]

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High-detail maps with Disser

Software open source para trabalhar com mapas

Software open source para trabalhar com mapas

Open data consultancy Conveyal released Disser, a command-line tool to disaggregate geographic data to show more details. For example, we’ve seen data represented with uniformly distributed dots to represent populations, which is fine for a zoomed out view. However, when you get in close, it can be useful to see distributions more accurately represented.

If the goal of disaggregation is to make a reasonable guess at the data in its pre-aggregated form, we’ve done an okay job. There’s an obvious flaw with this map, though. People aren’t evenly distributed over a block — they’re concentrated into residential buildings.

So Disser combines datasets of different granularity, so that you can see spreads and concentrations that are closer to real life.

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Interactive maps with R

Bibliotecas para construir mapas com alguma interação no R

Bibliotecas para construir mapas com alguma interação no R

You can make static maps in R relatively well, if you know what packages to use and what to look for, but there isn’t much direct interaction with your graphics. rMaps is a package that helps you create maps that you can mouse over and zoom in to.

Don’t get too excited though. A scan of the docs shows that it’s basically a wrapper around JavaScript libraries Leaflet, DataMaps and Crosslet, so you could learn those directly instead, and you’d be better for it in the long run if you plan to make more maps. But if you’re just working on a one-off or must stay in R because your life depends on, rMaps might be an option.

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